In the Archives

Added on by Jaime Permuth.

There are millions upon millions of photographs in the vaults of the Smithsonian.  This week however, I'm expanding my search to the National Archives in Maryland.  Counterintuitive? Perhaps.  I mean, I could spend the next year researching and never leave DC!  But as an artist you gotta trust your instincts.  

One thing is for sure: my Fellowship at SI is as complex, fascinating and challenging as I hoped it would be.

What's in a little black box?

Added on by Jaime Permuth.

What's in a little black box?

When I returned from Guatemala in mid-March, I had 5000+ new images on my hard drive. After seven weeks of daily editing (5AM to 9AM) I've pared down that number to just under 300 images.

Printed 4x6 inches, the stack fills the box to the brim.

My hope is that I will return from my Artist Residence at FotoVisura with a new edit of 100 shining photographs. Then, I can begin to lay out the book.

Interview with César Rodríguez for "Mexican Notebook"

Added on by Jaime Permuth.

For the series "Mexican Notebook" on fototazo, Tom Griggs, Hannah Frieser and I are curating an in-depth look at the contemporary photography scene in that country.  Today's installment is my interview with César Rodríguez a talented young photographer from Tepic, Nayarit who is starting to make a name for himself on the international stage.

Photo © César Rodríguez

Photo © César Rodríguez

In Memoriam, Saul Leiter

Added on by Jaime Permuth.
Leiter.jpg

Photo by Saul Leiter

 

When I first came to New York, I took a paid internship at Howard Greenberg Gallery.  Among my duties were tracking down and organizing images which were being pulled for collectors or considered for upcoming exhibitions.  This meant spending hours going through the archival boxes where the prints were stored.  It was a quiet and intimate way to discover the New York School photographers, which I hadn’t known about until then.  This was my first encounter with photographers like Sid Grossman, Louis Faurer, Leon Levenstein, Ted Croner and Saul Leiter.  There were also wonderful works by William Klein, Diane Arbus and Lisette Model.

Although Leiter walked the same streets as the rest of his generation, his work seemed to operate on an altogether different register.  For one thing, his images of city life seemed more abstract, oblique and intensely private than others. For another, they were in color. Where his contemporaries brought so much of the sound and fury of the city into their photographs, looking at an image by Saul was like suddenly catching hold of an errant string of piano chords drifting out of an open window high above the street’s heavy traffic.  His work elevated the experience of living in New York City and educated me to its subtle charms and revelations.

Many years later, when I enrolled at SVA for a Masters in Digital Photography, one of my instructors Amy Stein asked us to buy a photography book we admired.  We would then share the books in class, with each student making a short presentation.  When it was Hye-Ryoung Min’s turn to present, she brought out a copy of Steidl’s Saul Leiter monograph and with great composure and eloquence she proceeded to talk about the work. My heart skipped a beat.  It was like a secret handshake in a crowded room; a moment of shared complicity.  Three years later we would be married.

The rest is history.

Saul Leiter, rest in peace.

YONKEROS Book Signing and workshop at Gimanasio de Arte in Mexico City

Added on by Jaime Permuth.

I arrived back in NYC yesterday after a wonderful week in Mexico City.  The sprawling, beautiful monster of a city is one of my favorite places in the world.  While I was there, I was thrilled to present YONKEROS to a local audience.  The Book Signing was hosted by the very hip photography space Gimnasio de Arte, where I also taught a three-day intensive workshop in Project Management for photographers.  Here's a few snaps from the event.